Olivier Colombo - Consultant & Corporate Advisor
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Leatt-convertible-full-face-helmet-whistler-crankworx-2016

Leatt-convertible-full-face-helmet-whistler-crankworx-2016


Leatt has a huge presence here at Whistler. Neck protection has become a signature accessory for park riders, and Leatt hopes to expand their presence among the sport's top athletes to include helmets and body armor. Today, the vanguard protection brand showed its most important products for 2017, including a range of well-engineered apparel, and a good looking convertible enduro helmet.

Enduro 3.0 Helmet: $239.99 USD

Enduro venues most often require racers to wear a full-face helmet for timed stages, but allow half-shell helmets to be used for transfer stages, which often are grueling climbs. Convertible full-face designs provide the option to climb the transfers in a lightweight, well ventilated half shell, without lugging a second full-face lid around the race course. Leatt's Enduro 3.0 helmet has a pair of quick-release latches that make it possible for the rider to remove or replace the chin bar without removing the helmet.

Details:
• 360° Armourgel® Turbine inserts: reduces up to 30% of head impact at concussion level, 40% of rotational acceleration to head and brain, improves multiple-impact protection
• Removable chin bar
• Ventilation: 18 vents, effective at very low speeds.
• PC outer shell is offered in three sizes, with 3D in-molded impact foam for better energy absorption.
• Fidlock® magnetic buckle closure.
• One-dial retention.
• Break-away visor and low-friction cheek pads for easier emergency removal and rotational energy reduction.
• Certified and tested to EN1078; CPSC 1203 - Chin bar certified and tested to pass ASTM1952 standards 
• Weight: Weight: 700g +/-50g, without chin bar: 375g +/-50g
• Sizes: Small (51-55cm), medium (55-59cm), large (59-63cm)
• Contact: Leatt


Leatt's Enduro 3.0 helmet, in the half-shell configurations, is certified to EN1078 and CPSC 1203 standards, while the chin bar is certified to ASTM1952 standards, and it includes two important protection strategies: Leatt's 360-degree Armourgel Turbine technology to minimize rotational trauma, and a dual-layer foam liner with a V-shaped interface called 3D V-Foam. The EPS layer is in-molded with the helmet's plastic shell - a combination that, according to Leatt, allows them to make the helmet fit closer to the head. Leatt says that a smaller diameter helmet significantly reduces the consequences of rotational head trauma. Enduro 3.0 helmets are not certified to Downhill standards.

"Turbine Technology" refers to a number of circular discs which are placed around the inside of the helmet liner. In an impact, the specially-shaped discs are the first line of defense between the skull and the helmet. The energy-absorbing Armourgel discs have radial vanes, designed to flex in any direction, which lets the helmet rotate around the skull slightly. Leatt has used this technology in its full-face mountain bike and motorcycle helmets for a number of years, but 2017 marks the first time they have extended their rotational protection to an enduro or all-mountain lid.

The latching mechanism, as mentioned, is an over-center latch that snaps down relatively flush with the surface of the helmet. Leatt was careful to chamfer the edges of the parts of the levers that do protrude above the surface so that they should not hang up in a crash. The levers stay with the chin bar and the receivers in the helmet are carefully hidden, so when the chin bar is removed, there is little or no evidence that the Enduro half-shell was ever a full face.